Friday, August 17, 2012

The New Prints



Emily Joyce
Fuchsia Rose in Mike Kelley's Garden or Schooner 1, 2012
unique silkscreen on paper
58 x 55-1/4 inches
image courtesy of the artist and Inman Gallery

ModernHouston.net re-post from my article in June 2012

I love print shows. I collect prints because I don't have to sell my car to buy one, plus, I really enjoy works knowing that a few others are sharing my experience. So, I was excited to discover Inman Gallery had a print show of their gallery artists. Prints are as much about process as about production. Since each artist in the show presented a worthy piece or a few, I could not leave anyone out.

I could kick myself for missing the David Aylsworth show last month. His paintings are rich with texture and minimal in nature, just the kind of work I like to see. Luckily they have a nice lithograph print of Aylsworth’s which has a slightly different feel from his paintings. He used 9 colors, that means he had to layer the colors with 9 different plates or stones to create one image. Lithography is a labor intensive process, but the results are clean and clear.

Jason Salavon’s “Portrait (Hals),” is a digital c-print. Don’t let the word “digital” fool you into thinking this work is some kind of computer algorithm. Salavon uses the computer as a tool, yet the time and effort to create his images is no less involved as the physical labor of a lithograph. Besides, his portrait is compellingly haunting and reminds me of a burred Rembrandt. Whereas Salavon’s digital image references painting, Dario Robleto embraces the photograph flash flare effect. His suite of 9 photos looks like a light show of colorful misfires of a camera. Although, together the works feel very intentional.

Monotypes are interesting because the processes used are printmaking techniques, but only one image can be produced. Darren Waterston contributes several abstract monotypes in circle format, and though one is dripping outside the circle, I still get a sense these are planets floating on a cream white background. I also see a reference to 19th century Japanese prints in his work. Emily Joyce created a very pink, red, and wine colored spiral that en trances you to look further into the black and white center. Her work is kind of a monoprint, but she has made a unique silkscreen, after Warhol, I thought that was called a painting. After seeing her work “Sun Burn” (Burned), I am hoping I will get to see a solo show for Emily Joyce in Houston soon.

Monotypes are interesting because the processes used are printmaking techniques, but only one image can be produced. Darren Waterston contributes several abstract monotypes in circle format, and though one is dripping outside the circle, I still get a sense these are planets floating on a cream white background. I also see a reference to 19th century Japanese prints in his work. Emily Joyce created a very pink, red, and wine colored spiral that en trances you to look further into the black and white center. Her work is kind of a monoprint, but she has made a unique silkscreen, after Warhol, I thought that was called a painting. After seeing her work “Sun Burn” (Burned), I am hoping I will get to see a solo show for Emily Joyce in Houston soon.

ModernHouston.net for more images.

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