Sunday, June 20, 2010

Matthijs Bosman

Matthijs Bosman's work is usually the type of art that you have to be there to even get it, because the photos of most of the work make you want to be in that event, but the photo often leave you confused. However, Blank Barricade is one art piece that is easier to understand through a photograph, but you still wish you were there seeing the work. I think most protest art is not open to other interpretations and so those images are not really functioning as art, but as political propaganda. Bosman took that political art and the history of protest and wiped out the particular issue and leases us with a beautifully sublime bottom down democratic moment in any time and any place. This art crosses over into politics, without becoming a stooge of a particular point of view. This is political art at its best. See Galerie West for more work.

5 comments:

Caio Fernandes said...

be there , be there... yes it seems to be a really good work .
lately i have got scared with the fact the eye of people are geting too much formed by the computer scream and starting to elect what is good or not only by internet .....
we must to be there .

Troy Camplin said...

Seems to me that he's attempting to find the art in political action -- which is a very different thing from political art.

Todd Camplin said...

Camplin - Now we are splitting hairs, still in the realm of politics.
Caio - You’re right, I lived in a small town in Kentucky and I wasn't until I was a freshman in High School that I saw my first art museum. I had seen some pictures in books, but seeing the work in real life changed my life. I saw what the camera could not record. The internet is even poorer quality picture than a book.

Troy Camplin said...

It is not splitting hairs. Political art seeks to make a political point with the art. Art that finds the art in political action is not interested in making a political point, but finding the moment of beauty or sublimity in the political moment in question. If one can avoid making the work itself a political statement, it is not political art, but an art of political action. You wouldn't call paintings of ballerinas ballet, would you? Of course not. And that's not splitting hairs. It's a very different thing entirely. It is a remarkable moment in art that this artist has managed to find the art in politics without making his art political. It's a a moment that deserves proper recognition.

Matthijs said...

Very nice to see that people are talking about my Blank Barricade! There were some more elements to it that might clarify the position of the work between art and politics: In order to cross the barricade you had to stand on it. To stand on it you had to hold on to the picket signs and flags. It more or less forced you to litterally take a stand (on anything). Furthermore I didn't have a permit for the work, so in a short letter I invited everyone who lived around it, to take place on the sculpture if necessary, and state their objections. But of course there's also the aesthetics of the temporary settlement and of the pure white physicality of revolt.