Monday, July 27, 2015

"Return to Byzantium-The Art and Life of Lilian Broca"


A film about Romania mosaic art. "Return to Byzantium-The Art and Life of Lilian Broca"

Note from a Linkin Friend:

Dear friends,
I am thrilled to announce that the feature documentary "Return to Byzantium-The Art and Life of Lilian Broca", will premiere on Romanian National Television, TVR 2, on July 30th, 2015 at 10 PM. This one hour film won the Best Documentary Award at San Pedro International Film Festival, CA, in 2012.

I would appreciate your forwarding this announcement to your family and friends in Romania who may be interested in watching this program.

Thank you kindly,
Lilian

Friday, July 24, 2015

Looking at artists

I am looking at these artists and I am thinking about painting again. I have a few experiments to make first, but I feel the need to breakout doing something new/old.


Jonathan Lasker is an artist I have always been interested in while making my art. Google link.

Shirley Kaneda is another artist I ran across that I am now analyzing. Google link.

Charline von Heyl has also come to my attention. Google link.

David Reed has also been a great artist for his interesting painting style. Google link.


Monday, July 20, 2015

Visual Art Source by John Zotos



A review of my art show at Holly Johnson Gallery. If you missed the show, you can drop by the gallery and she will be glad to show you some pieces. Check out Visual Art Source link for the review. Thank you for the review John Zotos.


John Zotos
John Zotos
John Zotos

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Contain Me: Todd Camplin








One last look at my solo show at Holly Johnson Gallery, now over yesterday.

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Ink on paper


This piece uses ink on paper, text, and I cut out a few pieces, so you can see behind the drawing. 


Thursday, June 25, 2015

Top 5: June 4, 2015 

Every week, Glasstire.com does a show about the upcoming shows. This one is on June 4th and the two wonderful presenters (Rainey Knusdon and Christina Rees) use my art as a backdrop and also mention my show. Glasstire list gallery openings, does reviews, and generally supports the arts around Texas and they also have a link to Southern California.

 

Sunday, June 21, 2015

William Kentridge

So far, I have seen several films of his stop motion drawing films. The Menil Collection was showing two films when I was there a few months ago. The Fort Worth Modern had a huge show of his work with a great deal of his films. I must have spent hours being transfixed by this work. He would do a charcoal drawing, shoot it, then rub it out, draw over his old marks, and shoot again. Thus, he was making stop motion animation. He had strong political and social messages that both connected to historical context of the past 70 years.  Link.



Art in Dallas


















Friday, June 12, 2015

Azerbaijani Artist: Farid Rasulov


UNTITLED #4 From the Architectural Dichotomy series, 2013, Simulated concrete, fibreglass, plywood, wood and glass, 100 x 140 x 132 cm. (39¼ x 55 x 52 in.Untitled 




Last year I meet a someone from Azerbaijani and I was impressed by his drive for being an artist. I was reminded of him when I read Farid Rasulov's biography. Even though he could have been in the medical field, the artist bug bit him too and he began to make artwork that resembles some of the traditional geometric designs of Islamic art, but at an intense level and in domestic settings. His installation of a room is overwhelming. Here is a link to his site.

Azerbaijani Artist: Faig Ahmed

Fluid Forms


A more contemporary artist out of Azerbaijani is Faig Ahmed. He deconstructs traditional rugs in his work. The patterns break, bleed, and unravel to make interesting new works, while referencing the past designs. Here is a link to his website. I was impressed with the variations on his appraoches deconstructing these rugs.

Azerbaijani Artist: Tahir Salahov

Portrait of Oli Rukavishnikovoy 1998 (image)


So as eyes of Europe look towards Azerbaijani for the Baku Games, I started looking at the artists of the country. I first came across Tahir Salahov when I say this great portrait of Oli Ruavishnikovoy. I am reminded of high modern 1920's style treatment of the model with a background of decayed building. Her beauty is idealized while the surroundings is in complete contrast.
Salahov was able to navigate the soviet system and was awarded several honors during that period. He teaches at the Moscow Art Institute and now lives in Russia.

Saturday, June 06, 2015

RE GALLERY + MAKEBISH NEW YORK




Matthew Bourbon - Midnight Reader 2015 Acrylic On Canvas 28 x 28 inches 

ModernDallas.net re-post of my article: by Todd Camplin. link
Check out The Art Daily Part 2 page. They link this article and have a great deal of other exciting articles linked.

Last weekend was good times for the art community around Dallas. The energy was high around the Dallas Art Fair and surrounding art openings. I talked to several gallerists about how successful the fair had been and many were excited or at least pretty pleased about the turnout and sales. I know, I know, Art Fairs are just glorified trade shows, but I always find them enjoyable. Dallas’ version in particular has gotten better over the years. I noticed just a few of the out of town spaces that had a David Salle, and brought theirs, because of the Dallas Contemporary show of his work, I assume. I was able to get over to the DC as well, to see the three stellar shows they had up. I was a bit skeptical about Nate Lowman’s work, but I must admit, I was captivated by his canvas of the United States along with the other canvases he made. Only his lamps seemed to clutter up the place.  At the fair, few spaces chose to feature one artist, our own Barry Whistler Gallery showed just Nathan Green’s paintings. There was quite a lot of glam and shimmer, like all art fairs these days, but if you took your time a few gems appeared. I really enjoyed the RO2 booth. They splashed work all over the walls, but it worked for their artists. 

Of course, the Dallas Art Fair wasn’t the only show in town, Re Gallery had a main gallery and pop up space show in the same neighborhood. My old professor Matthew Bourbon at UNT was showing new paintings in the main space. I was surprised to see all new work, because he just took down a show in Houston a short while ago. These were smaller paintings, but no less packed with symbols and figures. In one piece, I almost didn’t see the figure at all. The person was reading a newspaper. Yes, people still read those things. But since Bourbon sometimes takes images from old movie clips, it is not farfetched to think he pulled his source material from something beyond recent past.

The Re Gallery popup/satellite was a collaboration with Peter Makebish of MAKEBISH New York. I was given a tour and I got to know a great deal about some of the pieces in the show. Chris Bexar’s imaginary landscapes are photos that look like cityscapes/close-ups of hardware. Bexar uses a tilt-shift technique to make the images look like toys. A few works are assembled from squares and applied to canvas to build the complete image. I was reminded of how Warhol would print images a few times, then leave an awkward space open on his canvas. Benjamin Terry had a few constructed paintings from wood. His brand of playful objects make his work more hybrid than painting or sculpture. It was no wonder he was included in the Family Ties show at 500x, which opened the same night. I think I am still trying to wrap my head around Alika Herreshoff’s paintings plus objects. Herreshoff doesn’t take minimalism that serious and that kind of mocking disregard for tradition is something I can respect. I just don’t know if she totally pulls it off. I need to see some more of her work in person. I suspect I will come around, though.
Matthew Bourbon’s show will be up through May 10th. The pop-up space is located in Dallas, on 1505 Gano Street at Quonset Hut #3 and the show comes down April 30th.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

PAUL BOOKER


Blue Current, 2015, ink, oil enamel & polyurethane on panel,72 x 48 inches.

ModernDallas.net repost


Most of us have flipped through a science textbook and stopped on a page with a complex image illustrating an object or concept. Usually these images are pretty simple, but a few books will have an energetic, ambitious illustrator that will create a complex design that puts you in a state of wonder. A really dynamic illustration of a cell helps explain and inspire future scientists. Although Paul Booker isn’t closely portraying scientific phenomenon, you get the feeling his imaginative images of flowing systems could easily inspire someone to become a scientist, meteorologist, or an engineer of fluid dynamics. Even someone to become an artist, after all, seeing his work back in his Dunn and Brown show encourages my own development as an artist.

Paul Booker is now showing with Cris Worley Fine Arts in a solo show titled Flow Through. A show of little particles flowing all over his image. His blog points to his interest in extreme weather patterns, sound waves, and the not so empty space of the cosmos. All of which fell relevant to many of his works. Pink Current is an ink enamel and polyurethane on panel painting which depicts little black and also little white particles flowing around, leading your eye all over the panel. His method of applying 100 or so layers of polyurethane to the work makes the image seem dimensional. Booker manages to get his flowing objects not to act as drawings on a flat surface giving the illusion of space, but rather drawings on several layers. So, the drawings are on lower layers and upper layers, thus these paintings are not really flat. I know what you must be thinking, I just called them paintings, then drawings, then paintings again. Well, I am not afraid to say I am unclear what to call them, because Booker seems to be creating both. I first encountered his method of painting years ago when I visited Dunn and Brown, but before then I saw Booker drawing on the wall with sculpture at 500x. He had drawn on small clear sheets, and then pinned them to the wall. With all those pinned sheets, Booker made the pieces flow across the wall. His paintings, though contained within a rectangle, still accomplish a similar experience.

Paul Booker is now showing with Cris Worley Fine Arts in a solo show titled Flow Through. A show of little particles flowing all over his image. His blog points to his interest in extreme weather patterns, sound waves, and the not so empty space of the cosmos. All of which fell relevant to many of his works. Pink Current is an ink enamel and polyurethane on panel painting which depicts little black and also little white particles flowing around, leading your eye all over the panel. His method of applying 100 or so layers of polyurethane to the work makes the image seem dimensional. Booker manages to get his flowing objects not to act as drawings on a flat surface giving the illusion of space, but rather drawings on several layers. So, the drawings are on lower layers and upper layers, thus these paintings are not really flat. I know what you must be thinking, I just called them paintings, then drawings, then paintings again. Well, I am not afraid to say I am unclear what to call them, because Booker seems to be creating both. I first encountered his method of painting years ago when I visited Dunn and Brown, but before then I saw Booker drawing on the wall with sculpture at 500x. He had drawn on small clear sheets, and then pinned them to the wall. With all those pinned sheets, Booker made the pieces flow across the wall. His paintings, though contained within a rectangle, still accomplish a similar experience.

Pink Current, 2014, ink, oil enamel & polyurethane on panel, 24 x 48 inches. Ridges – Yellow and Green is a watercolor and ink on paper. A watercolor done in Booker’s style refreshes the medium for me. Traditionally watercolor is used as a sketch for a larger work on board or canvas. Only a few masters at watercolor helped to raise its profile now and then. Booker’s watercolor is as solid as any painting or sculpture he has done. It looks to me Booker was fearless in his execution of this often overlooked medium. The title suggested that water was there and dried up, leaving ridges. Well that is true both symbolically and literally. Water did dry to make this image. Flow Through is a title of another watercolor that captivated my attention with the drama and energy of his lines.

Flow Through with works by Paul Booker continues until May 9th at Cris Worley Fine Arts.

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Holly Johnson Gallery : Contain Me : Ink Drawings by Todd Camplin


Holly Johnson Gallery is pleased to present, Contain Me: Ink Drawings by Todd Camplin. A reception will be held Saturday, May 16, from 6 to 8 p.m. Contain Me, the artist's second solo show with the gallery, features fourteen new works and continues through July 18.

Todd Camplin has been abstracting text into detailed ink drawings for nearly a decade. Often taking months to complete individual works this painstaking process involves the repetition of small words, letters and marks evocative of highly detailed maps and textiles.

Camplin recently came across his old package design text books from his time as an undergraduate in graphic design and was inspired to create works for this exhibition. He focused on several different approaches with the idea of abstracted text and containment that includes: box designs, filling the paper, and dropping the box out of the design.

Camplin explains, "This communicates the idea of how we create frameworks for our writing in order to make coherent compositions. The box is a kind of device that holds the text like a piece of line paper holds a short essay. The works without the boxes are more like stream of consciousness writings and the filled drawings repeat like a long iambic pentameter poem."

Todd Camplin was born in 1973 in South Bend, Indiana. In 1998 he earned a B.F.A. from Western Kentucky University. In 2006 he received an M.A. in Arts and Humanities from the University of Texas at Dallas. In the spring of 2010, he received an M.F.A. from the University of North Texas in Denton. He currently resides in Jefferson, Texas.

Holly Johnson Gallery is located at 1845 Levee Street #100 in the Dallas Design District. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:00, Tuesday through Saturday. For information please call 214-369-0169, email info@hollyjohnsongallery.com, or visit www.hollyjohnsongallery.com.

Holly Johnson Gallery
Contain Me
Ink Drawings by Todd Camplin
May 16 - July 18, 2015



Handbag PS272, 2014 ink on paper, 30 x 22 inches

Saturday, May 09, 2015

Cole Art Center

At the Cole Art Center in Nacogdoches Texas. Texas National and a show about the Chinese contribution to building United States.